Time Traveling with the Amish

Where Indiana meets Michigan, Michiana as it’s known, time travel is possible. Here in the Land o’ Goshen, the Amish have settled and continue a lifestyle reminiscent of hundreds of years ago, placing merit on humility and hard work.

Elkhart County, Indiana has the second largest population of Amish in America. More than a religion, this is a way of life. The shunning of technology is not from an idea that new things are inherently bad, it comes from the drive to always remain humble.

We wondered how folks in Amish Country tame a wild hair and, after following a few leads, enrolled ourselves in a Dutch oven cooking class. It turned out to be quite the… CONTINUE READING >>

Where Indiana meets Michigan, Michiana as it’s known, time travel is possible. Here in the Land o’ Goshen, the Amish have settled and continue a lifestyle reminiscent of hundreds of years ago, placing merit on humility and hard work.

Elkhart County, Indiana has the second largest population of Amish in America. More than a religion, this is a way of life. The shunning of technology is not from an idea that new things are inherently bad, it comes from the drive to always remain humble.

We wondered how folks in Amish Country tame a wild hair and, after following a few leads, enrolled ourselves in a Dutch oven cooking class. It turned out to be quite the… CONTINUE READING >>

Ain’t it Quaint?

Join us in Vermont in the wintertime – quaint and lovely.  We survived skiing – all limbs intact – ate at two diverse eateries and stayed at a charming lodge.

The quaintness factor continued to increase the entire trip. So much so that when we turned off the main road in Vermont we were immediately greeted by a picture perfect covered bridge over a snowy stream… CONTINUE READING >>

Join us in Vermont in the wintertime – quaint and lovely.  We survived skiing – all limbs intact – ate at two diverse eateries and stayed at a charming lodge.

The quaintness factor continued to increase the entire trip. So much so that when we turned off the main road in Vermont we were immediately greeted by a picture perfect covered bridge over a snowy stream… CONTINUE READING >>

Pleasing the Palate in Puerto Peñasco

A huge part of how we acquire knowledge about new locales is by exploring their culinary fare. On our expedition to Mexico’s Puerto Peñasco we continued in that tradition.

As is often the case, we found that the typical food of an area is not what we Americans expect when we think of “ethnic” food. Italian pizza is not even remotely comparable to the Dominos version and real Mexican food ain’t no Taco Bell. In fact, “real” Mexican food varies drastically depending on the region in which the meal is prepared. In Puerto Peñasco real means …  CONTINUE READING >>

A huge part of how we acquire knowledge about new locales is by exploring their culinary fare. On our expedition to Mexico’s Puerto Peñasco we continued in that tradition.

As is often the case, we found that the typical food of an area is not what we Americans expect when we think of “ethnic” food. Italian pizza is not even remotely comparable to the Dominos version and real Mexican food ain’t no Taco Bell. In fact, “real” Mexican food varies drastically depending on the region in which the meal is prepared. In Puerto Peñasco real means …  CONTINUE READING >>

Italian Riviera Romp

Just a few kilometers down the Ligurian Coast from the bustling burg of Genoa –and at least a million mental miles away — is peaceful Camogli, Italy.

Jet-set types like Charles Dickens, Lord Byron and Percy Shelley have been slowing down and kicking back along these shores of the Italian Riviera for nearly two centuries, back when they were “jetting” about in carriages and … CONTINUE READING >>

Just a few kilometers down the Ligurian Coast from the bustling burg of Genoa –and at least a million mental miles away — is peaceful Camogli, Italy.

Jet-set types like Charles Dickens, Lord Byron and Percy Shelley have been slowing down and kicking back along these shores of the Italian Riviera for nearly two centuries, back when they were “jetting” about in carriages and … CONTINUE READING >>

Under Sea St. Croix

Like an iceberg in the tropics, only the tip of St. Croix is visible above the surface. To truly experience what the island has to offer one must look below the water line.

We returned to the island during the holidays and from previous trips were prepared to be flexible as the Christmas Winds are usually ablowin’. These annual “Jesus Breezes” produce high seas that make the water murky and boat rides stomach churning. Patience will pay. Just wait a day or two, there is there is always perfect water weather within any week’s span.

Buck Island National Park with… CONTINUE READING >>

Like an iceberg in the tropics, only the tip of St. Croix is visible above the surface. To truly experience what the island has to offer one must look below the water line.

We returned to the island during the holidays and from previous trips were prepared to be flexible as the Christmas Winds are usually ablowin’. These annual “Jesus Breezes” produce high seas that make the water murky and boat rides stomach churning. Patience will pay. Just wait a day or two, there is there is always perfect water weather within any week’s span.

Buck Island National Park with… CONTINUE READING >>

Digging Up History in Porto Torres, Sardinia

Can you imagine? You are building a new train station, and every time you put a shovel to the ground you dig up an ancient statue, vase or Roman coin. This is the case in Porto Torres–a working dock city on the island of Sardinia.

Like a great many cities in Italy, Porto Torres was built and rebuilt, each civilization one on top of the next. Geography played a huge part in the development of this colony, as ships came to the harbor directly from Rome. Prior to the Romans, the Phoenicians and Carthaginians used the harbor as a seaport. The harbor now is serviced by ferry boats shuttling people and goods back and forth from Genoa, Italy and Marseille, France, as well as the island of Corsica.

Invading hoards and malaria have both plagued the… CONTINUE READING >>

Can you imagine? You are building a new train station, and every time you put a shovel to the ground you dig up an ancient statue, vase or Roman coin. This is the case in Porto Torres–a working dock city on the island of Sardinia.

Like a great many cities in Italy, Porto Torres was built and rebuilt, each civilization one on top of the next. Geography played a huge part in the development of this colony, as ships came to the harbor directly from Rome. Prior to the Romans, the Phoenicians and Carthaginians used the harbor as a seaport. The harbor now is serviced by ferry boats shuttling people and goods back and forth from Genoa, Italy and Marseille, France, as well as the island of Corsica.

Invading hoards and malaria have both plagued the… CONTINUE READING >>