Did Robert Johnson Really Make a Deal with the Devil?

We continue our series of social distance friendly travel ideas with a look at our trip along The Mississippi Blues Trail several years ago. Markers highlight the history of blues pioneers and stars from the delta to Chicago.
A young Robert Johnson was hanging around the locally renowned bluesman Son House and the elder musician told the kid he needed to do some serious practicing if he was going to be any good. Johnson disappeared for a while, when he returned House supposedly said that he must have made a deal the devil… CONTINUE READING >> 

We continue our series of social distance friendly travel ideas with a look at our trip along The Mississippi Blues Trail several years ago. Markers highlight the history of blues pioneers and stars from the delta to Chicago.

Highway 61 Blues Trail Marker

Our first finds were near Tunica, with the official visitors center for the trail and markers for Son House and Robert Johnson. (click here to see our full story on the Mississippi Blues Trail!)

Johnson is sometimes called “The Father of The Blues,” but the elder House was a mentor to him (does that make him the grandfather?) and perhaps the source for the legend of the crossroads. The story goes something like this:

A young Robert Johnson was hanging around the locally renowned bluesman Son House and the elder musician told the kid he needed to do some serious practicing if he was going to be any good.

Johnson disappeared for a while, when he returned House supposedly said that he must have made a deal the devil at the crossroads to get so good so fast.

Abbay & Leatherman, Robert Johnson's Boyhood Home, Mississippi Blues Trail

Abbay & Leatherman, Robert Johnson's Boyhood Home, Mississippi Blues Trail

This crossroads has generally been assumed to be the intersection of Highways 61 and 49, but just before he passed away Son House indicated that it was somewhere else, adding a bit more intrigue to the story. Ah, something else to add to our quest.

Son House Marker, Mississipi Blues Trail

(click here to continue down the Mississippi Blues Trail!)

Bonus Time: The marker for Harold “Hardface” Clanton, Muddy Waters, James Cotton, Sam Cooke and Ike Turner.

The Marker for Harold Hardface Clanton, Mississippi Blues Trail

(click here to see more of the Robert Johnson story)

David & Veronica, GypsyNester.com

YOUR TURN: Are you a blues fan? Did you learn anything new? Is this a roadtrip you’d consider taking?

Road Trip! Toolin’ Down Illinois’ Great River Road

Driving is a great way to travel and still maintain safe social distancing. With that in mind, here is another fantastic drive from a few years ago…
The Mighty Mississippi in all of its glory – the history, the lore, the beauty and the quirkiness.

Join us as we head down the Great River Road with stops in beautiful, historic Galena, Wine Country (yup, there’s wine in Illinois!), Moline, where David traces his roots (he’s John Deere’s g-g-g grandson!),  amazing Nauvoo, and Quincy, where we meet the self-proclaimed “Nutroll Nazi.” And that’s just the… CONTINUE READING >>

Driving is a great way to travel and still maintain safe social distancing. With that in mind, here is another fantastic drive from a few years ago…

First Stop: Beautiful, Historic Galena

Main Street, Galena Illinois

Galena, Illinois was at one time the center of attention for not only the state, but the United States, as her most prized resident was President Ulysses S. Grant.

Through our hilarious, yet informative guide on the Galena Trolley we learned the history, lore and politics of this architecturally rich city.

Galena’s Main Street has been named a National Register Historic District and it’s easy to see why. The buildings have been wonderfully preserved and most serve as shops and restaurants, making Galena not only a delight for history buffs, but foodies and shoppers alike!


Click here to enlarge photos and learn more about beautiful, historic Galena
Galena, Illinois

Vinny Vanucchi's in Galena Illinois

One of those restaurants is Vinny Vanucchi’s, and some Italian food was sounding pretty darn good to us.

The historic building has been transformed into four distinctive dining areas, including an outdoor cappuccino garden.

Testing our theory that the way to judge an Italian restaurant is by their meatballs, Vinny passed with flying colors.

Vinny Vanucchi's in Galena Illinois
Click here to enlarge photos and get a load of the food at Vinny Venucchi’s

The entrance to the Irish Cottage Boutique Hotel in Galena, Illinois

By traveling just about a mile, we were magically transported from Italy to Ireland.

The Irish Cottage Boutique Hotel accomplished that journey when we checked into County Clare. Actually it was our suite for the night, as each guest room is decorated and named after an Irish county.

We were astounded by the attention to detail the Irish Cottage brings to all aspects of their service.

The Irish Cottage Boutique Hotel, Galena Illinois
Click here to learn what a “pub snug” is and why we think ALL hotel breakfasts should be like the Irish Cottage’s!

They Have Wine In Illinois?

Rocky Waters Vineyard and Winery, Hanover, Illinois

Making our way down the big river, our next stop was the Rocky Waters Vineyard and Winery just outside the little town of Hanover.

About twenty years ago, Jared & Phyllis Spahn purchased a lovely fruit tree-laced piece of land that inspired the planting of a vineyard.

While the grapes grew, Jared designed the fantastic building that houses the winery and tasting room and Phyllis tended the fledgling adventure.

Rocky Waters Winery and Vineyards, Hanover, Illinois
Click here to see more about Rocky Waters

Yup, There’s a Place Called Poopy’s

Poopy's Biker Bar in Savanna, Illinois

From the relaxed to the rambunctious, we made that transition in just a few short miles when we stopped in at Poopy’s in Savanna.

Billed as “Illinois’ Biggest Biker Destination,” Poopy’s is way more than just a biker bar.

What began as a motorcycle parts shop has evolved into everything anyone who’s ever thrown a leg over a Harley could want.


Click here to find out what goes on at Skid Mark Stadium and see one of the funniest menu’s we’ve ever seen!
Poopy's in Savanna, Illinois

Peace in the Palisades

Overlooking the Mississippi River at Mississippi Palisades Park in Illinois

Wow, that was enough to send us looking for a peaceful place to commune with nature, and there’s no more scenic a spot along The Great River Road than Mississippi Palisades State Park.

Trails along the palisades edge, high above the river, led us to several precariously perched overlooks. The panoramic views from atop the bluffs seemed endless. It was like we could see the entire Midwest laid out before us. An unbeatable photo op of Old Man River.

Tracing Our Roots in Moline

Stoney Creek Inn, Moline Illinois

In Moline, of Quad Cities fame, we checked into The Stoney Creek Inn before heading to dinner at Johnny’s Italian Steakhouse.

Stoney Creek Inn feels like a wilderness lodge, complete with the elevator hidden inside a giant stone chimney.

By contrast, Johnny’s is sleek and modern, and they know what to do with a slab of beef. We figured about half a cow ought to be enough to get us fueled up for the next day’s activities.

Biking the Great River Trail in Moline, Illinois

We hit the ground running, or more precisely riding, as we biked along The Great River Trail from Moline to Rock Island, another of The Quad Cities.

The trail runs over sixty miles along The Mississippi, but we felt like five was about enough for this morning. Besides, we had a date with The John Deere Pavilion.

David’s Such a Deere!

The birthday boy at the John Deere Pavilion!

This was doubly special to us because it was David’s birthday, and John Deere is his Great, Great, Great Grandfather.

We experienced everything — from one of Grandpa Deere’s original steel plows to the most massive of modern machinery — and even climbed aboard a combine the size of a small town.


See a “Star Wars”-like walking machine and find out what happens when David wrecks a piece of his grandfather’s heavy equipment!
The John Deere Pavilion in Moline, Illinois

A strange bust of John Deere at the Deere-Wiman house in Moline Illinois
A strange and wonderful bust of John Deere.

The tracing of the family tree continued when we toured the Deere Family Homes at The Butterworth Center.

Our guide, Gretchen, was incredibly knowledgable, not only about the history of the house, but the genealogy of the family. She laughed that she knows more about the Deere family background than her own.

At the historical society we found a book tracing the family all the way down to David’s father. Quite a memorable birthday.


See more of these fantastic homes and the ceiling that was imported from Venice!
The Butterworth Center and Deere-Wiman House in Moline, Illinois

What’s a Birthday Without a Treat?

Lagomarcino's in Moline Illinois

Luckily for us, since 1908, the folks of Moline have been satisfying their sweet teeth at a fourth-generation, family-owned establishment, Lagomarcino’s.

Upon entering, we were engulfed by nostalgia and the enticing smell of handmade chocolate. The custom made booths, Tiffany lamps, the terrazzo tile floor and metal ceiling combined to transport us to the Illinois of yore.

Lagomarcino's in Moline Illinois
Click here to learn what a “Green River” is and why we think hot fudge should always be served on the side

The Oldest Winery in Illinois

Baxter's Vineyard, Illinois Oldest in Nauvoo

Our trek down The Mighty Mississippi next brought us to Nauvoo, home of Illinois’ oldest winery, Baxter’s Vineyards.

The Baxter family has been making wine for five generations, and their experience and attention to detail shows.

The wines are still made the old fashioned way, no big machinery or assembly lines, right in the specially designed basement of the winery.

Baxter's Winery, Nauvoo Illinois
Click to find out more about the family behind the oldest vineyard in Illinois

How Can Buffet Food Be This Good?

Hotel Nauvoo, Illinois

Nauvoo is known for more than its wine, Hotel Nauvoo, is not to be missed. Built as a home in 1840, it became the Hotel Oriental in 1885 and has been under the current name since 1946.

Beautifully maintained and decorated, the building really is a showplace, but that’s not why most people come to the hotel.

It’s the superb buffet the brings in the crowds.

Find out what its like to eat under an indoor apple tree and why cinnamon rolls are not just for breakfast!
Hotel Nauvoo, Illinois

The Town & Country Inn, Quincy Illinois

Just a short stretch down the road was our final destination, Quincy.

We hit a local favorite, The Abbey, for a cozy dinner before checking into The Town & Country Inn to rest up for our last day along the river.

A Visit With “The Nutroll Nazi” of Quincy Illinois

The self-proclaimed Nutroll Nazi of Underbrink's Bakery in Quincy, Illinois

We started our day in Quincy with a visit to Underbrink’s Bakery, and a trip back to a simpler time when baked goods were made with care, by hand, from scratch.

Owner and baker extrodinaire, LeRoy Rossmiller showed us all of the inner workings, all while delivering a running commentary popping fresh with humor and sarcasm. In a nod to Seinfeld’s “Soup Nazi,” he calls himself The Nutroll Nazi. Folks come from all over for his angel food cupcakes and verbal abuse.


Click find out why that baby is in the mixer and watch the video of the “Nutroll Nazi” and his antics!
Underbrink's Bakery

3665 Strong

Villa Katherine, a Moorish styled castle perched above the Mississippi River in Quincy Illinois

With our minimum daily requirement of sugar more than met, we were ready to take in some of what sets Quincy apart, its incredibly preserved historic architecture.

The city has 3,665 buildings listed on The National Register.

Our exploration of Quincy began at Villa Katherine, a Moorish styled castle perched above the Mississippi River. Built in 1900 by eccentric world traveler George Metz based on Villa ben Ahben in Morocco, it now houses the Tourist Information Center.

Quincy Illinois
Click here to enlarge these photos and to see which building was sawed in half to move it across the street!

Riding our bikes along Quincy’s waterfront gave us a fantastic view of the Bayview Bridge over The Mississippi. We stopped for a photo, and one last look at the legendary river that inspired our incredible journey along The Great River Road.

Biking along the Mississippi River in Quincy

David & Veronica, GypsyNester.com

Thanks to Enjoy Illinois for making this adventure possible! Our opinions, as always, are our own. The GypsyNesters are Illinois Mile Markers

YOUR TURN: Have you visited any of these amazing places? Have we inspired you to take an Illinois Road Trip?

Picture This: The Petrified Forest


As we continue to seek out social distance friendly destinations the wide open spaces of Arizona offer an intriguing option… ancient, petrified trees!
When we heard forest, we expected large groups of upright trees. We felt kind of dumb. The petrified trees are all laying on the ground – alive with vibrant color – left there about 225 million years ago during the Late Triassic… CONTINUE READING >>

As we continue to seek out social distance friendly destinations the wide open spaces of Arizona offer an intriguing option… ancient, petrified trees!

Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona

A Petrified log in The Petrified National Forest, Arizona

Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona is definitely a drive-through park.

The road stretches twenty-seven miles north-to-south through the forest with numerous pullouts and side roads for viewing the sights.

Calling it a forest gave us the wrong impression. The petrified trees are all laying on the ground, left there about 225 million years ago during the Late Triassic period.

When we heard forest, we expected large groups of upright trees. We felt kind of dumb.

Huge logs in The Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona
Yes, those are real buildings behind those huge logs!

A tree in the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona - beautiful!

All those million years ago this area was an upright tropical forest. Fallen trees accumulated in river beds and were buried by volcanic ash.

The silica in the ash dissolved and seeped into the logs, forming beautiful quartz crystals.

Other minerals combined with the silica to create the rainbow of colors in the petrified wood.

Buried for eons, it wasn’t until about sixty million years ago that the Colorado Plateau began to be pushed up, forming mountains and allowing erosion to expose this ancient lumber.

Petrified wood, up close in The Petrified Forest National Park of Arizona

Wondering what else there is to do in the area around The Petrified Forest?

Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona

Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona

At our first stop, The Crystal Forest, a walking trail led us through hundreds of downed ancient trees, giving us our first up close look at the petrified wood.

It’s amazing how the rock has retained the exact look of the trees. The grain, rings and even the bark are perfectly preserved in stone.

Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona

Our next pull off was Blue Mesa. From the top of the mesa we got a great view of valleys filled with petrified logs.

Many of them have rolled down and gathered in the canyons, while others are still being exposed by erosion that continues today.

Wondering what else there is to do in the area around The Petrified Forest?

Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona

Petrified wood, up close in The Petrified Forest National Park of Arizona

As we continued north, we crossed I-40 and the Route 66 marker. When the old highway came through here back in the twenties, tourists began discovering this unique fossilized collection.

Unfortunately, they also began removing a lot of the specimens. The area was preserved as a national monument by Teddy Roosevelt in 1906, but it wasn’t until the depression that Civilian Conservation Corps workers built infrastructure for the park and began to really protect it.

In 1962, the monument became Petrified Forest National Park.

Still, even with fines as high as $325,000.00 an estimated twelve tons of artifacts disappear from the park each year.

David & Veronica, GypsyNester.com

See all of our Arizona Adventures!

On a Mission in San Antonio, Texas

We continue our look back at the best ways to travel while keeping our social distance, this time on bicycles.
Seemed like we should learn more about Texas’ second-largest city, so we had our mission, should we decide to accept it.
And mission is the right word. San Antonio wouldn’t even exist if not for missions. The most famous being the Alamo… CONTINUE READING >>

We continue our look back at the best ways to travel while keeping our social distance, this time on bicycles.

The Missions of San Antonio, TexasThere are two things we’ve known about San Antone since childhood.

Davy Crockett, whether played by Fess Parker or John Wayne, fought at the Alamo there and Charley Pride wanted to know if anybody was goin’ there.

Seemed like we should learn more about Texas’ second-largest city, so we had our mission, should we decide to accept it.

And mission is the right word. San Antonio wouldn’t even exist if not for missions.

The most famous being the San Antonio de Valero Mission, better known as the Alamo, but four others follow the river south through the city.

Built in the early 1700s as Spain began to expand colonization northward, these were lonely outposts in an often hostile wilderness.

Each mission was much more than just a church though, they were self contained little cities.

Spain‘s expansion was both political and religious, as the two were completely intertwined back then.

While the Franciscan friars were attempting to convert the Tejas natives, the military was using the compounds as fortifications and hoping to discourage France from expanding westward from Louisiana.

Communities sprung up around the missions as they were completed, with hundreds, sometimes thousands, of natives farming, trading and converting.

Many lived within the walls, the others could seek safety inside should danger approach.

The settlements flourished for the better part of a century, but by the early 1800s life in Texas was changing. By then the missions were no longer the only game in town so their importance began to fade a bit.

Our mission (we decided to accept it) began at the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park.

San José Mission in San Antonio, Texas

The park was created in 1975 to ensure the continued protection of the missions other than The Alamo, which has been maintained by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas since 1905.

Mission San José y San Miguel de Aguayo, the largest and most ornate of the five missions, is home to the headquarters for the park.

San José was a great place to start. After a quick browse of the visitors center we ambled through the giant protective walls and into the mission itself.

A great glimpse into life out on the frontier well before the colonies back east had even thought about independence.

Mission San José in San Antonio, Texas

Barracks, storage and a dining hall for the troops line one wall while along the opposite side, housing for three hundred and fifty native workers was built right into the walls of the fortress.

The complex is, of course, dominated by the church. Very much like the grand cathedrals of Europe, San José sports an incredible dome and bell tower. It doesn’t seem so out of place these days, surrounded by city, but it had to stand out like the proverbial turd in a punch bowl back around 1730.

As a part of the park, a paved trail leads to the two missions south of Mission San José. A ten mile round trip, it would be a heck of a hike, but it’s perfect for bicycles. So we broke out our trusty bikes and pedaled down the trail toward Mission San Juan.

Makin' Hay by Tom Otterness in San Antonio, Texas

Along the way, we encountered some strange folks working in a field.

On closer inspection, we discovered that they were giant farmhands made of hay and steel.

Makin Hay is the creation of well-known public artist Tom Otterness.

We let them be so they could continue on while the sun shined.

The chapel of The Mission San Juan Capistrano, San Antonio, Texas

The Mission San Juan Capistrano is not the same one that the swallows like so much that they keep coming back.

That’s out in California, but we wouldn’t blame them if they liked this one too.

San Juan was the most successful of the five missions agriculturally, with orchards, crops and thousands of cattle and sheep in its heyday.

There are still beautiful lush grounds surrounding the misson today.

Mission San Francisco de la Espada In San Antonio, Texas

A short ride further brought us to the southernmost of the San Antonio missions, Mission San Francisco de la Espada, or just Espada for short.

Espada was the first Spanish mission in Texas, but not at it’s current site. Originally founded in East Texas in 1690, Espada was moved to the banks of the San Antonio River in 1731 as the area expanded.

The churches at these first three missions are still in use today, providing a parish home for the locals, just as they have for nearly three centuries.

Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción in San Antonio, Texas

After riding north along the river back to the visitors center, we decided to continue on to see the Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción.

The bike trail ends so we rode along the city streets. This put us on the same roads as the driving tour of the missions, well marked and not a problem for cyclists.

Drawing on the walls of The Mission Concepción in San Antonio, Texas

The Mission Concepción is being studied as an archeological site and, as a result, has the most thorough and detailed displays than the other missions.

Veronica took off ahead and made a fascinating discovery while I locked up the bikes.

Once I caught up to her, she was thoroughly engrossed in the remnants of colorful patterns and pictures on the walls.

Drawing on the walls of The Mission Concepción in San Antonio, Texas

On display in the old mission’s library, there are numerous examples of religious symbols and native designs that were intended to make the converts feel more at home with their new religion.

We found it all fascinating, but our mission was not completed. Four down, one to go.

Though separate from the Park, it is possible to continue on to the Alamo from Mission Concepción. We opted to drive rather than ride that part of the tour to give us the chance to park downtown and do a bit of nightcrawling along the Riverwalk.

The Alamo in San Antonio, Texas

The Alamo stands in stark contrast to the modern city that surrounds it. But in many ways it is the reason San Antonio exists at all.

As Mission San Antonio de Valero, The Alamo was the first mission built in this area, so the village that grew up around it, known as San Antonio de Béxar, became the most important settlement in the region.

Inside the Alamo, San Antonio, Texas

Over a century later, when Texas declared independence from Mexico in 1836, The Alamo figured prominently in the city and region’s history again.

Even though the Texians were defeated in the battle of The Alamo, it served as a rallying cry that inspired the new republic’s ultimate victory just over a month later. “Remember the Alamo!”

It’s no wonder The Alamo has become the most popular tourist site in Texas. With over four million visitors a year, it is one of the most popular historic attractions in the country and continues to keep San Antonio going strong.

Gentleman remove hats. The rules to enter the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas

This IS Texas, so the locals shouldn’t need to be told, but there is a sign at the mission’s entrance reminding any bushwhackers or greenhorns to remove their hats before entering sacred ground.

The Daughters of the Republic don’t take this lightly. Show some respect, act like somebody.

With proper reverence and hats in hand, we entered the old chapel.

The memorial honoring the men who fought at the Alamo in San Antoino, Texas

Across the street, competing with an astounding amount of cheesy tourist traps, stands a memorial honoring the brave men who fought and died at The Alamo.

They gave their lives so that Texas could live.

Mission accomplished.

David & Veronica, GypsyNester.com.

This post may contain sponsored links.

Utterly Unexpected Palo Duro Canyon

It isn’t hard to keep your social distance out on the lone prairie, in fact it might be harder to find someone to get too close to. Still, there are some big surprises and here’s one of the biggest! Out of nowhere the Texas prairie drops one thousand feet down into the second largest canyon in the United States. CONTINUE READING >> 

It isn’t hard to keep your social distance out on the lone prairie, in fact it might be harder to find someone to get too close to. Still, there are some big surprises and here’s one of the biggest!

We know everything’s big in Texas, and the Lone Star State is full of surprises… but this was one BIG surprise!

To make it even more surprising, we didn’t find it in Big Bend National Park, or even in that southwest part of the state where mountains are a part of the landscape.

No, the impressive Palo Duro Canyon is right smack in the middle of the plains of the panhandle. Out of nowhere the prairie drops one thousand feet down into the second largest canyon in the United States.

If we hadn’t known what we were about to encounter our jaws would have hit the ground. They almost did anyway.

Driving toward the rim we couldn’t help but think about what early settlers rolling across the smooth, open prairie in their covered wagons must have though when they hit the edge.  “This is too easy, nothin’ to it. We’ll be in Caiforn… Holy $#*%!!!! What in the Sam Hill is this?”

It was formed by the Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red River during the Pleistocene era, when melting Ice Age glaciers provided massive torrents of water. Thousands of years later, in 1934, this incredible geologic wonder became Palo Duro Canyon State Park.

Soon after that the CCC, Civilian Conservation Corps, built roads, trails, cabins, and campgrounds that still serve the park’s hundreds of thousands of visitors.

On our recent autumnal visit we found nary a drop of the water that carved through the layers of rock through the ages, but we did find amazing colors in the resulting formations. These are very reminiscent of the Grand Canyon.

Even in the fall it can still be pretty hot, so we spent most of our time driving the miles of roads that took us over the edge and down the slope of the canyon wall then in a loop along the floor.

We did stop for a couple short hikes, one led to a formation called the painted rocks, where fairly recent erosion has exposed a large cliff of red-orange stone.

The other took us to a stone that natives had used for grinding roots, mesquite beans, and various seeds for food.

Over the ages the process wore down obvious holes in the rock that allowed archeologists to make the discovery.

Soon after that we encountered a good sized flock of wild turkeys. With the heat and lack of water, these were the only wildlife we saw all day, but we guess that they would have made a fine meal too.

When we drove back up on the rim, we stopped in for a quick look through the visitor’s center and then another short walk that took us to an overlook with a panoramic view of the entire upper portion of the canyon.

From there we got a long distance view of the park’s most famous landmark, Lighthouse Rock, which made us feel okay about skipping the six mile trail that would have given us a close up view. With that, we felt that we had done a pretty good job seeing most of the sights.

Amarillo is only twenty five miles to the north, but we decided to stay in the closer town of Canyon. This smaller, and definitely quirkier, little enclave proved to be a good choice.

It is home to West Texas A&M University, and the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum on its campus, along with a couple interesting eating establishments that we can heartily give two thumbs up.

Feldman’s Wrong Way Diner was fun, with model trains circling the ceiling, but our favorite for both the food and its unique combination had to be Pepito’s Mexican Restaurante & Auto Sales.

We have a strict rule to never stop in Texas without getting our fill of Tex-Mex. However, we can’t say that we’ve ever considered getting our burritos and Buicks in the same place, but we can declare that at least the food was fantastic. No word on the wheels

On our way back to the main road in Amarillo the following morning, we made a quick pit stop at the RV Museum. The collection is on display at Jack Sisemore Traveland, which is the oldest RV dealership in the state.

Jack began collecting vintage trailers, campers, and motorhomes back in 1986, and has managed to gather quite an impressive array that embody the past century of Recreational Vehicle development.

After spending most of the last ten years in our three motorhomes, we couldn’t help but be intrigued, and were definitely not disappointed.

Right off the bat we were greeted by a 1915 Ford Kampkar. The body was actually made by Anheuser-Busch and fitted on to a Ford chassis, creating what was one of the first motorhomes, rustic as it may have been.

As we moved on, we encountered over a dozen other iconic models including the very first Airstream from 1935, a 1967 VW hippie bus, a 1976 FMC that was owned by Max Factor, and the 1948 Flxible bus featured in the Robin Williams movie RV.

One of the coolest things about this museum is that we were not only able to view these babies from the outside; the interiors are also open and impeccably restored. We could have spent all day, but had to get going.

As we pulled back out onto the highway it seemed more than fitting that we were traveling along the course of Route 66.

We certainly got our kicks.

David & Veronica, GypsyNester.com