What Places To Visit In Hoi An with Your Soulmate

Not too far from Danang, there is a picturesque, small town Hoi An, which attracts travelers from all over the world. Yellow two-story buildings decorated with lanterns, colorful Chinese pagodas, and a beautiful sea – this is why the city has become a favorite destination of many people in love.

1. Canton Assembly Hall

The building, also known as Quan Cong (Canton is the old name of the Chinese province), was built by merchants from the southern province of China in 1786. The hall was used for relaxation, meetings, and religious ceremonies. One of the main figures is Quan Cong – a Chinese general from the time of the kingdom of Wu (existed from 222 to 280 AD).

2. Fujian Assembly Hall

Fujian Assembly Hall was built at the end of the 17th century for merchants from the province of China. Fujian natives were one of the most prominent merchant communities in Vietnam. They also built pagodas in Saigon and other cities. The house has an altar of one of the most important deities for Fujian residents – the sea goddess Thien Hau. Merchants worshiped her before setting sail. Externally, the building looks like the Canton Assembly Hall, so for architecture fans it will be quite interesting.

3. Fung Hung House

Fung Hung House is located right behind the Japanese Bridge – this is one of the largest ancient mansions of Hoi An. The building was built in 1780 by a family that earned money by selling glass products, spices, and incense. The architecture of the house combines elements of Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese traditions. The two-story building is made out of 80 wooden columns. As in other ancient houses of the city, there is a family sanctuary in Fung Hung. In addition, there are awesome views from the balcony of the second floor.

4. My Son Sanctuary

This is the most interesting place of the Vietnamese sights of the Champa civilization. This archaeological site is an hour’s drive from Hoi An and is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site. From the 4th to the 12th centuries, the capital of the kingdom of Champa was here. When the lands were captured, the city was abandoned. However, its towers and temples of red brick and sandstone may “survive” for centuries.

5. Minh Huong Communal House

Minh Huong Community House is located in central Hoi An, opposite the central market. This beautiful building in typical Chinese architectural style is one of the city’s several communal houses. Minh Huong House was built in 1820. It is worth a visit as evidence of bygone days. Externally, the building looks like an attractive example of the interpenetration of two cultures – Chinese and Vietnamese.

6. Museum of Folk Culture

The Hoi An Folk Culture Museum is young – it has existed since 2005. But it has already gained popularity thanks to exhibits telling about the culture and applied art of ordinary Vietnamese villagers. The museum is located in the historic center, in an old wooden two-story house. It is also known as the museum of folklore.

7. Japanese Covered Bridge

The Japanese Covered Bridge, depicted on the coat of arms of Hoi An, is considered its symbol. It connects the two main streets of the old city, decorates Hoi An, and serves as a reminder of its varied history and past greatness. From the 17th to the 19th centuries, it was a large commercial seaport. Chinese and Japanese merchants came here in the spring and remained until the end of summer. They returned home with the south wind. Over time, many remained to develop the business out of season. So, there were Chinese and Japanese communities, settled on a national basis.


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