Port-la-Joye / Fort Amherst on Prince Edward Island, Canada

Port-la-Joye was captured in 1745 by New Englanders from the American colonies to the south, who built a new fortification called Fort Amherst. British rule ultimately led to renaming the island… CONTINUE READING >> 

Port-la-Joye was captured in 1745 by New Englanders from the American colonies to the south, who built a new fortification called Fort Amherst. British rule ultimately led to renaming the island… CONTINUE READING >> 

Hitting the Canadian Maritimes with Road Scholar!

Once again we are preparing for a journey with the remarkable outfit Road Scholar. As a not-for-profit organization, their mission is continuing education through travel for those of us who have reached a certain age.

AND starting on Sunday we will be live-blogging the entire adventure!

As we found last year on our trip to The Galapagos Islands and Machu Picchu with Road Scholar, this philosophy brings together like-minded travelers who… CONTINUE READING >> 

Once again we are preparing for a journey with the remarkable outfit Road Scholar. As a not-for-profit organization, their mission is continuing education through travel for those of us who have reached a certain age.

AND starting on Sunday we will be live-blogging the entire adventure!

As we found last year on our trip to The Galapagos Islands and Machu Picchu with Road Scholar, this philosophy brings together like-minded travelers who… CONTINUE READING >> 

I’m Sick and Tired of the Moose-cuses!

I’m convinced it’s a conspiracy.

I’ve spent quite a bit of time in “moose”-laden territory over the past few years. In these areas, I’ve seen quite a few “moose.”

Startled looking heads mounted over fireplaces, taxidermic atrocities in front of campy places of business, bronzed statues in public squares, and souvenir store mugs, tees, and shot glasses with cartoon “moose” in a plethora of wacky situations giving all sorts of North Woodsy advice.

Never, EVER have I seen one in real life.

Until recently, I was a believer in the myth of the “moose,” but … CONTINUE READING >>

 

I’m convinced it’s a conspiracy.

I’ve spent quite a bit of time in “moose”-laden territory over the past few years. In these areas, I’ve seen quite a few “moose.”

Startled looking heads mounted over fireplaces, taxidermic atrocities in front of campy places of business, bronzed statues in public squares, and souvenir store mugs, tees, and shot glasses with cartoon “moose” in a plethora of wacky situations giving all sorts of North Woodsy advice.

Never, EVER have I seen one in real life.

Until recently, I was a believer in the myth of the “moose,” but … CONTINUE READING >>