Getting our Patriot On in Boston

Join us as we follow the Boston Freedom Trail on our patriotic journey where it all began… Boston… CONTINUE READING >> 

It All Starts with a Tea Party (or Having our Morning Tea)

David channeling his best Samuel Adams at the Boston Tea Party Museum
David channels his best Samuel Adams
at the Boston Tea Party Museum

We begin our patriotic journey where it all began, at the Boston Tea Party Museum.

Replica ships wait in the harbor for new groups of patriots to board, but first we sit in on a meeting of The Sons of Liberty that led to the famous protest back in 1773.

After our rowdy “Hizzahs!”, our mob scrambles to the ships where we throw bales of tea in to the harbor. Yup, true story.

Boston Tea Party Museum

A patriot shows us around the Boston Tea Party Museum
Our first brush with a real live patriot – not to be our last!

The Old State House where the tea party meetings happened in Boston
Melds with modern downtown: The Old State House

One of the events that led to the tea uprising, The Boston Massacre, took place a few years earlier, in 1770, at The Old State House.

We stand on the very spot where tensions ran high — and finally snapped — when British soldiers shot into a crowd of colonists, killing five men and injuring six others.

The site of The Boston Massacre

The Old South Meeting House

The incident became a rallying cry for those who wished to throw off the yoke of British rule.

Nearby, The Old South Meeting House stands just as it did on that fateful night of December 16, 1773, when thousands of fed up Bostonians gathered and decided to stage a history changing protest.

They called it The Destruction of the Tea, but we know it better as the Boston Tea Party.

<– The Old South Meeting House

Freedom Trail – ho!

The Freedom Trial Marker in Boston

Paul Revere's grave at the Old Granary Burial Ground in Boston

As we follow the Boston Freedom Trail, we arrive at the Old Granary Burial Ground, the city’s third-oldest cemetery, dating back to 1660.

This is the final resting place for many patriots, including Paul Revere, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and the five victims of the Boston Massacre.

Old Granary Burial Ground in Boston

The Cradle of Liberty and Real Yankee Food

Stopping in at Faneuil Hall has been an everyday event in Boston since 1742

Stopping in at Faneuil Hall has been an everyday event in Boston since 1742, so naturally we make our way there.

Serving as both a marketplace and a meeting hall, it was the venue for rousing speeches encouraging independence from Great Britain – earning it the nickname “Cradle of Liberty”.

Quincy Market in Boston

In 1826 the marketplace was expanded creating Quincy Market, as more and more people came to this crossroads of the city.

The markets have featured food since they opened, and Durgin-Park is the oldest existing restaurant in Faneuil Hall Marketplace, so that’s the place for us.

Durgin-Park is the oldest existing restaurant in Faneuil Hall Marketplace in Boston

Durgin-Park opened in 1826, but the location has been feeding Bostonians all the way back to 1742. They still serve up classic Yankee fare, so pot roast and a lobster roll is dinner — with a Sam Adams beer to wash it down — it would be unpatriotic otherwise.

Lobster Roll and Yankee Pot Roast at Durgin-Park in Boston

Heading North

Paul Revere statue and the Old North Church, Boston
Paul Revere’s statue with The Old North Church in background

The North End of Boston has many of the city’s most famous landmarks, including the Old North Church.

Built in 1723, this is where Paul Revere sent the “One if by land, and two if by sea” signal across the Charles River.

Still an active church, the interior has kept the old box pews that were common in colonial times. Families paid an annual fee for their private boxes.

Box pews at the Old North Church in Boston

The Old North Church in Boston

Nowadays, people sit anywhere they choose.

<– The Old North Church

Paul Revere lived near the church and his house, built around 1680, is still standing.

It is the oldest house in downtown Boston, with an astounding ninety percent of the building being the original materials.

The furnishings are believed to have belonged to the family, and several fine examples of Revere’s silversmith work are on display too, including one of his famous bells.

Paul Revere's house in Boston

Battling Bunker Hill

The Monument for the Battle of Bunker Hill

The town of Charleston stands across the Charles River and is best known for being the starting point of Paul Revere’s ride after the signal from the North Church, and also as the site of the Battle of Bunker Hill a few months later.

The battle for control of the hill on June 17, 1775 was the first major conflict of the Revolutionary War.

The Bunker Hill Monument commemorates that battle, but actually stands atop Breed’s Hill, which was where most of the fighting took place.

Continue on… read Boston – Eat, Bike, & Beer Merry

David & Veronica, GypsyNester.com

YOUR TURN: Where would YOU make a beeline for when landing in Boston?


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