A Fiberglass Menagerie – the Mecca of Roadside Ginormous Stuff

Nothing
lifts the spirits while traveling through America quite like the sight of
a fiberglass colossus looming in the distance. On a summertime roadtrip, through the shimmering
heat from the highway, a form begins to take shape…

A sky-scraping
Abe Lincoln, a Paul Bunyan the size of a small office building,
a life-sized brontosaurus or a fish that could swallow an airliner
— all have great power to inspire, or at least attract attention.

As any
seasoned voyager trekking throughout the heartland of America
will tell you, spotting giant steakhouse steers, cheese
haus bessies
, liquor store pink elephants, muffler shop gorillas
will garner excited oohs and
ahhs.

In many communities, opening a business without a fiberglass
mascot is the kiss of retail death.

F.A.S.T. (Fiberglass Animals, Shapes & Trademarks Corporation) in Sparta Wisconsin

In the course of our travels we have interviewed several business
owners about their colossal fiberglass attention-grabbers and learned
of a place in Wisconsin that is the Mecca of campy creatures, the motherland
of molded monstrosities–F.A.S.T. (Fiberglass Animals,
Shapes & Trademarks Corporation).

The fiberglass bicylist mascot of Sparta, Wisconsin

So we set out on a pilgrimage to
Sparta, Wisconsin and the giant fiberglass mold field of dreams.

Entering
the site, we spied the mold field and began
to get that need-to-pee feeling of a kid on Christmas morning.

There were acres of molds scattered about – leaping dolphins, dragons,
Vikings, religious relics, Yogi and Boo Boo bears of all
shapes and sizes.

Fiberglass animals n front of FAST Corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

All waiting outside for a return trip to the shop
and a new life drawing attention to kitschy stores, booster clubs,
benevolent orders and backyards.

The mold field at FAST corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

But
then attracting attention is what F.A.S.T. is all about.

An artist at FAST Corporation sculpts a fiberglass frog in Sparta, Wisconsin

Snooping
around the artists’ workshop, and
drawn in by the blaring rock music, we met Corey, one of the sculptors,
who was shaping a man-sized ornamental frog.

Corey
holds a fine arts degree and had learned of F.A.S.T. through
one of her favorite professors. Toward the end of her senior
year the professor asked her if she was planning on using
her art degree for “serving coffee” or if she
was serious about her craft. Knowing that Corey loved
to work with “big things”, as she put it, he pointed
her in the direction of
F.A.S.T.. Boy did she find the right place!

Corey
was kind enough to show us her
process.

It all starts with a drawing. Corey had been provided
a rendition of the frog she was sculpting from the client
who commissioned the work.

Starting off with quick setting
polyurethane foam, Corey fashions the design with filet knives,
sandpaper and a blow torch. More foam is squeezed out as needed, to fill hollow
spots or attach large appendages. Lather, rinse, repeat.

Every item
that F.A.S.T. produces begins as a hand-sculpted original creation.
The biggest behemoths, the friendly little and
flamingos – even beloved icons like the Budweiser Clydesdales and
the hamburger-holding Big Boy start as a twinkle in the artist’s
eye.

A fiberglass technician shows us how molds are made at F.A.S.T. corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

Once
the artist has a finished piece, it’s time to make a mold. Corey pointed
us toward the workshop where the fiberglass is applied.

Inside we met Lupe, a fiberglass technician, who
demonstrated how the polyurethane figures are coated with a
releasing agent before multiple layers of fiberglass are
sprayed on.

The glass sets in a matter of minutes,
creating a mold that’s a perfect negative image of the prototype.
The finished mold is then removed from the original polyurethane
sculpture.

A fiberglass technician shows us how molds are made at F.A.S.T. corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

Then, the process is flipped and fiberglass is put inside the mold. Lupe
explained that once the concoction has set, the mold is opened
and gives birth to an exact replica of the original sculpture.

Lupe is proud of the prominent places around the
world where his work is displayed and loves to hear from
family and friends when
they spot one.

The naked newborn is then sent back to the artists for the finishing touches.

The mold field at FAST corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

What happens the molds? They are set out in the field, waiting for another client
to choose them as an attraction.

Pre-molded choices include a full-sized
nativity scene, an eight foot swirl ice cream
cone, or one (or several) of the seven dwarves.

If an original creation is desired, it can get very pricey,
sometimes into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The mold field at FAST corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin
See how this Abe Lincoln turned out – and where he ended up!

The mold field at FAST corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

The mold field at FAST corporation in Sparta, Wisconsin

A giant fiberglass moose at FAST in Sparta, Wisconsin

Back
in the artists’ workshop, the sanding and painting begins.
Automotive paint and clear-coat help bring to life
a strikingly realistic likeness or a humorous cartoon critters.

Corey took us to a second studio where a ginormous moose
was nearing completion. Stoic and substantial, we could
imagine him standing
in front of a hunters’ supply store, an Alaskan jerky factory,
or maybe one of your antler clubs (a Moose lodge, perhaps?). (Not that we believe in moose!)

Without
a doubt, the true masterwork for F.A.S.T., their magnum
opus, is the 145-foot muskie outside of the Fresh Water
Fishing Hall of Fame in Hayward, Wisconsin.

The giant fiberglass muskie outside of the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame in Hayward, Wisconsin

Inside the mouth of the 145-foot muskie outside of the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame in Hayward, Wisconsin

Billed as a
“walk-thru fish one-half city block long, four and a half stories
tall, hand-sculpted into the likeness of a leaping muskellunge”
— this guy does not disappoint. His gaping, open jaw accommodates
more than twenty people as an observation platform.

Wanting to
get it straight from the fish’s mouth, we left Sparta and headed
to Hayward that very day.

What a beaut.

Has to be
the biggest fish story ever.

David & Veronica,
GypsyNester.com

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